The Ballacraine, St John’s, was built as the mansion house for the Ballacraine estate but probably became an inn around the 1820s. Now a private house it was the most famous pub on the TT Course and features in the George Formby film ‘No Limit’ when he crashes through the front door on his racing bike.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

The Ballacraine, St John’s

The Ballacraine, St John’s, was built as the mansion house for the Ballacraine estate but probably became an inn around the 1820s. Now a private house it was the most famous pub on the TT Course and features in the George Formby film ‘No Limit’ when he crashes through the front door on his racing […]






St James church, Dalby, built in 1839. The church opens into a schoolroom behind sliding doors. The schoolroom now serves as a community meeting hall.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

St James’ Church, Dalby

St James church, Dalby, built in 1839. The church opens into a schoolroom behind sliding doors. The schoolroom now serves as a community meeting hall. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Ramsey Swimming Pool, built in 2008 with a wave-form roof, appropriate for a pool by the sea.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Ramsey Swimming Pool

Ramsey Swimming Pool, built in 2008 with a wave-form roof, appropriate for a pool by the sea. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






The Pipe Factory in Laxey. Originally built as a warehouse by the Captain of the Laxey Mines, it has served as a grain warehouse, a factory for making pipes (in the 1980s), and now it is offices.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

The Pipe Factory in Laxey

Originally built as a warehouse by the Captain of the Laxey Mines, it has served as a grain warehouse, a factory for making pipes (in the 1980s), and now it is offices. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






The British Hotel, North Quay, Douglas. Built in 1896 it tries to echo the timbered construction of Tudor buildings of the Elizabethan period. A style that has become known as ‘Tudorbethan’.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

The British Hotel, North Quay, Douglas

Built in 1896 it tries to echo the timbered construction of Tudor buildings of the Elizabethan period. A style that has become known as ‘Tudorbethan’. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Ramsey Park Hotel, built in 2012 as part of a larger scheme to develop the Mooragh area. This red, cream and grey box with its incongruous picket fence is a rather strident and shocking intrusion into an otherwise sedate area.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Ramsey Park Hotel

Ramsey Park Hotel, built in 2012 as part of a larger scheme to develop the Mooragh area. This red, cream and grey box with its incongruous picket fence is a rather strident and shocking intrusion into an otherwise sedate area. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Onchan Village Hall, Baillie Scott, 1898.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Onchan Village Hall

Onchan Village Hall, Baillie Scott, 1898. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Link House, Finch Road, Douglas. A fine Victorian house of the 1850s when this road was an elegant and exclusive place to live. Like all the houses along here it has been converted into offices and the fine gardens behind made into car parks.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Link House, Finch Road, Douglas

A fine Victorian house of the 1850s when this road was an elegant and exclusive place to live. Like all the houses along here it has been converted into offices and the fine gardens behind made into car parks. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






The lower entrance to the Manx Museum in Douglas, at the bottom of Crellin’s Hill. This fine door case once stood nearby at the entrance to a public house, long since demolished. Thankfully it was saved and moved to its new location.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

The lower entrance to the Manx Museum in Douglas

The lower entrance to the Manx Museum in Douglas, at the bottom of Crellin’s Hill. This fine door case once stood nearby at the entrance to a public house, long since demolished. Thankfully it was saved and moved to its new location. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Piccadilly Court on Douglas promenade. A modern scheme of apartments that replaces earlier Edwardian hotels but with a little of their original elegance.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Piccadilly Court on Douglas promenade

A modern scheme of apartments that replaces earlier Edwardian hotels but with a little of their original elegance. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Lifeboat House, Port Erin. Built in 1925 the two-storey extension was added in 1996. It houses a B class lifeboat..

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Lifeboat House, Port Erin

Built in 1925 the two-storey extension was added in 1996. It houses a B class lifeboat. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Collinson’s Cafe, Port Erin. This is a fine Edwardian building which once housed a dance floor, and the cafe was a favourite meeting place for the internees in the Port Erin internment camp during WWII. It is now a private house.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Collinson’s Cafe, Port Erin

This is a fine Edwardian building which once housed a dance floor, and the cafe was a favourite meeting place for the internees in the Port Erin internment camp during WWII. It is now a private house. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Belfast House, Prospect Hill, Douglas. Built in 1898 using the distinctive red brick imported from Wales with the addition of red tiles. Look carefully and you can see a red terracotta dragon sticking out of the corner of the 3rd floor.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Belfast House, Prospect Hill, Douglas

Built in 1898 using the distinctive red brick imported from Wales with the addition of red tiles. Look carefully and you can see a red terracotta dragon sticking out of the corner of the 3rd floor. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Central Apartments, Douglas promenade. Originally built as the Broadway Hotel, it is a striking feature of the seafront. It was built using red bricks from north Wales which were brought to the Island in the boats that were used to take the lead ore from Laxey. The bricks served as ballast on the return journey and were used in many buildings on the Island.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Central Apartments, Douglas promenade

Originally built as the Broadway Hotel, it is a striking feature of the seafront. It was built using red bricks from north Wales which were brought to the Island in the boats that were used to take the lead ore from Laxey. The bricks served as ballast on the return journey and were used in […]






Hampton Farm housing development on the Castletown Road coming in to Douglas. A scheme to provide affordable housing for first time buyers. Brightly coloured and using a mix of render and wood cladding, they are a welcome relief from the tired and lazy designs of most Manx housing schemes.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Hampton Farm Housing Development

Hampton Farm housing development on the Castletown Road coming in to Douglas. A scheme to provide affordable housing for first time buyers. Brightly coloured and using a mix of render and wood cladding, they are a welcome relief from the tired and lazy designs of most Manx housing schemes. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Originally built in 1804 for the 4th Duke of Atholl as his private home using stone from Arran in Scotland. It became a hotel in 1831 but in recent years it has stood empty and neglected.
Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

The Castle Mona, Douglas promenade

Originally built in 1804 for the 4th Duke of Atholl as his private home using stone from Arran in Scotland. It became a hotel in 1831 but in recent years it has stood empty and neglected. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Seabank, Shore Road, Laxey. A house with its gable-end towards the sea featuring a two-storey bay window.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Seabank, Shore Road, Laxey

A house with its gable-end towards the sea featuring a two-storey bay window. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Point of Ayre lighthouses and foghorn. When the main lighthouse was built in 1819 it was near the edge of the sea. However, since that time the Point of Ayre has grown bigger and a second, smaller light was placed on the shingle in the 1950s. The foghorn dates from 1890, but is no longer used.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Point of Ayre lighthouses and foghorn

When the main lighthouse was built in 1819 it was near the edge of the sea. However, since that time the Point of Ayre has grown bigger and a second, smaller light was placed on the shingle in the 1950s. The foghorn dates from 1890, but is no longer used. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






Church Hall, Derby Road, Douglas. Originally built as a Methodist church in 1890 it became the Church Hall for St Thomas’ church, then the Red Cross Centre, and now it’s used as a practice room for brass bands.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

Church Hall, Derby Road, Douglas

Church Hall, Derby Road, Douglas. Originally built as a Methodist church in 1890 it became the Church Hall for St Thomas’ church, then the Red Cross Centre, and now it’s used as a practice room for brass bands. Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS






The Old Courthouse in Athol Street in Douglas was built in 1841 as the Oddfellows’ Hall. The Oddfellows were a society set up to help and protect its members at a time when there was no welfare state. The building eventually became the Island’s main courthouse and a police station. It has now been converted to offices and a restaurant.

Photograph: Patricia A Tutt, ARPS

The Old Courthouse

The Old Courthouse in Athol Street in Douglas was built in 1841 as the Oddfellows’ Hall. The Oddfellows were a society set up to help and protect its members at a time when there was no welfare state. The building eventually became the Island’s main courthouse and a police station. It has now been converted […]






Windsor Terrace

Windsor Terrace

“Windsor Terrace in Douglas as seen from the Manx Museum.  I was lucky to have lived in No. 5 for most of my childhood.  The woods below were a great playground.” Bernard Quayle






Billown Mansion

Billown Mansion

“Billown Mansion, Malew, in the morning sun.” June Whiteman






Laxey Pavilion

Laxey Pavilion

“#ilovethisbuilding because when we moved to the Island in 1995, I spent many hours here at the Pavilion in Laxey Glen Gardens when my daughter, then aged 5, went to ballet classes there and I met many other mothers who became friends.” Suzy Holland






Peel Centenary Centre

Peel Centenary Centre

“#ilovethisbuilding because it’s the only arts and performing arts venue run entirely by volunteers – and is within the heart of the community in Peel, but entertaining people Island wide. The Centenary Hall was built in 1877 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the visit of Charles Wesley to Peel.  Nearly 140 years later it […]






Working Men’s Institute

Working Men’s Institute

“The Institute in Laxey is one of my favourite buildings.  Beautifully restored and saved from falling down by a group of volunteers and now run by a small voluntary committee for the community.  It’s a true community building playing host to gigs, children’s parties, exercise classes, mums and tots, Scottish dance group and dog club.  […]






Flat, Royal Avenue West

Flat, Royal Avenue West

“My favourite building is my flat in Royal Avenue West.  We live on the top floor, which gives us a great view over Port Jack Glen, and over Onchan Harbour, so we can watch the boats coming and going.  The boarding houses were built in 1906, and were subsequently turned into an internment camp for […]






Isola Restaurant, previously Scott’s Bistro

Isola Restaurant, previously Scott’s Bistro

“#ilovethisbuilding because my parents bought it in the 1980’s and turned it into Scott’s Bistro.  May dad was passionate about it but died after a couple of years running it in 1987.  I ran the Bistro with my mum until it was sold to Don and Elsa Slee.  It’s the oldest house in Douglas and […]






Great Meadow

Great Meadow

“Great Meadow, Castletown – large castillated property built between 1100-1890.” Simon Costain






Changing Rooms

Changing Rooms, Laxey

“I have always been intrigued by this building on Laxey shore.  I don’t know when it was built, but like to imagine it was used by beach-goers in the 20’s and 30’s.” Kate Brier






Ballyre House

Ballyre House

“Ballyre House was built circa 1865 and we have been fortunate enough to live in it for the last 5 years or so.  Renovations were hard work but it’s almost done.  Hidden from the road it is my favourite place, a haven for birds and with an ever-changing view from the back – our neighbour […]






Chapel, Ballaleigh Road

Chapel, Ballaleigh Road

“I’ve always liked this little building of Ballaleigh Road.” Simon Costain






Chasms

Chasms

Suzy Holland






Lough House

Lough House

“Lough House in Ramsey is a registered building surrounded by rather uninspiring low rise blocks of flats and modern houses.” Suzy Holland






St Ninian’s Church

St Ninian’s Church

Christmas concert at St Ninian’s Church on 16 December 2016 which raised funds for local homeless charity Graih. The land to build the church in 1913 was bequeathed by Henry Bloom Noble through trustees of his estate.  St. Ninian’s church (dedicated to Ninian of Whitehorn was designed by W. D. Caroe and is a major […]